Digital History

European Protest Movements Since 1945

Supported by the European Union, the website of this research network provides a comprehensive academic database for scholars working on European protest movements since 1945. It brings together international young academics and leading experts from various disciplines for joint conferences and publications, and gives them a forum for scientific exchange and high-level instruction. Currently, the network has about 200 affiliates in more than 30 countries.
Website: www.protest-research.eu

 

1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956-77

This online teaching and research guide serves, together with a corresponding book, as a concise reference on the intellectual avant-gardes, counter-cultures and protest movements of the 1960s and 1970s both in Western and Eastern Europe. It traces the history of the various protest movements and the plethora of national experiences with respect to domestic and transnational cultures of dissent, the transnational aspects of these movements, and the common narratives and cultures of memory surrounding them.
Website: www.1968ineurope.com

 

The Civil Rights Struggle, African-American GIs and Germany

This digital archive explores the connection between the U.S. military presence abroad and the advancement of civil rights in the U.S. We investigate the role that African American GIs played in carrying the civil rights movement to Germany, which was host to the largest contingent of U.S. troops deployed outside the U.S.
Website: www.aacvr-germany.org

 

The Nuclear Crisis:  Cold War Cultures and the Politics of Peace and Security, 1975-1990

Seeking to establish a transatlantic history of the nuclear crisis of the 1980s that includes both East and Western Europe, this project wants to combine these two perspectives to examine both the diplomatic, political and strategic debate surrounding the NATO Double-Track Decision, as well as the dissent and actions of the various peace movements and activists that accompanied its implementation. Thus merging an “establishment”-perspective with an analysis of protest cultures in a multi-layered and interactive model, the projects will transcend the narrow boundaries of traditional diplomatic history by including non-state actors, intellectual discourses, and the role of culture into the study of international relations and domestic dynamics.
Website: www.nuclearcrisis.org